Should you be Shamed into Hand-washing After CNA Training?

September 16th, 2014

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We all learn how important hand-washing is when we’re studying in our CNA training classes. We learn that hand-washing is the number one tool we can use to fight against diseases and illnesses in the workplace. It not only protects us from contracting illnesses after CNA training, but it also helps to prevent the spread of disease and sickness from patient to patient.

Washing your hands is pretty easy, although it does take a bit of time after CNA training- about two rounds of ‘Happy Birthday.’ The problem is, sometimes you might not have an extra minute to wash your hands or wash them correctly. Sometimes your day may be so swamped that you feel as if you have to rush right though the normal and necessary parts of your day.

This isn’t good. No matter how insane and chaotic your shift is, when you work with patients after CNA training, hand-washing isn’t optional. Unfortunately, many CNAs try to get away with no washing their hands, or they simple forget to do so in the chaos of their routine.

Because of this, many hospitals are now attempting to do something about it. No, they aren’t having another in-service where they lecture you for an hour about the importance of hand-washing. Instead, they are utilizing technology to actually shame you into washing your hands when you need to wash them.

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How to act Around Guide Dogs After CNA Training

September 14th, 2014

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A couple of days ago, we talked about the best tips for taking care of a blind or visually impaired individual after CNA training. Today, we’re going to take things a step farther and talk about how to address or act around a guide dog.

It’s important to note that guide dogs are not just used by blind individuals; they can be trained to help individuals with a variety of disabilities. They help their handlers travel, live more independently at home, and inform others when something is wrong with their handler; for instance, some guide dogs are trained to bark or act a certain way when their handler is about to have a seizure or has low blood sugar.

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Tips for Helping Blind Patients After CNA Training

September 12th, 2014

cna trainingWhen you complete CNA training courses, you’ll have the opportunity to work with many different patients, some of which will be visually impaired or even blind. Caring for these individuals who have special needs will be slightly different than caring for other patients, and it will be up to you to make sure they have as comfortable and easy a stay in the hospital or nursing home you work in as possible. Here are a few tips on how to do this after CNA training.

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Caring for Children After CNA Training

September 10th, 2014

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Are you privileged enough to work with children after CNA training? Whether you’ve obtained a job at a doctor’s office or you work in the pediatric ward at a hospital, it’s important to remember that kids are kids. They aren’t small adults. That means they require a different approach than adult patients, especially when it comes to communication.

If most of your CNA training was focused on the geriatric side of patient care, however, you may be a little overwhelmed when you first begin helping your health care team take care of patients. There are a few tips you can use here, though, that can help.

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6 Things you Weren’t Told in CNA Training

September 8th, 2014

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Have you ever heard the phrase, “Some things can’t be taught?” After CNA training, you’ll discover this is not only true, but some of that things that can be taught, just aren’t. That’s okay, though. It’s those little discoveries and learning experiences after CNA training that help you become certain of the future you want to make for yourself. They help you appreciate the time you spend as a CNA and help you understand this new world a little better.

During CNA training, there will be a few things that they aren’t going to teach you, that you’ll simply have to learn on your own- or right here on this blog.

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After CNA Training: When You’re Stuck With the Bully

September 6th, 2014

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I’ve told you before that after I finished CNA training, I worked in a nursing home. It was some of the most challenging work I’d every done, but the smiles of every patient I cared for made all of the long hours and the hard work worth it. My colleagues made it worthwhile as well; I considered most of them to be good friends during work hours, and some even became my friends outside the facility.

After a year of working with the same people, though, things were bound to change. We’d occasionally welcomed new CNAs into our fold, but most of them found that after CNA training, they couldn’t handle the work or they would rather work at a different facility with fewer hours and higher pay. At about the year mark, though, we said hello to a few new faces that ended up becoming much more permanent.

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After CNA Training: Blogging About Patients

September 4th, 2014

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So, you’ve started your own blog, and you want to share your experiences after CNA training. That sounds like a great idea! Blogging about your work after CNA training is a way to help others learn from your experiences. But, do you know what you can and cannot share about the patients you care for? In order to avoid violating HIPAA, it’s important that you do. Whether you’re writing someone in your blog or just updating your status on Facebook, here’s what you have to avoid.

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Coping With PCOS After CNA Training

September 2nd, 2014

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Dealing with a illness like PCOS after CNA training can be difficult for CNAs. After your training ends, you’ll probably work long hours, lack regular sleep, and sometimes you won’t exactly feel like eating the healthiest of meals (who thinks a kale salad sounds good at seven o’clock in the morning?)

When you have PCOS, it can be difficult for you to live the healthy life you need to after CNA training. You may become so caught up with your everyday routine of helping your patients that you forget to take a step back and help yourself. If you have PCOS, though, there are some steps you can take to help manage it, even when dealing with a busy (and sometimes crazy) life after CNA training.

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5 Tips for Beginning CNA Training

August 30th, 2014

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In many states, individuals who want to become CNAs have to take at least 75 hours of CNA training. This is the federal mandate. In some states, the number of hours required is higher. If you’re planning on becoming a CNA, though, the hours of CNA training required in your state isn’t the only thing you need to consider. There are other things you must think about to help you through the process.

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How to Stay Motivated During CNA Training

August 28th, 2014

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There’s a transition that happens when you begin CNA training. You go from being an ordinary person to a certified nursing assistant. You may not realize this at first, but the result is huge. You become someone who holds life of others in your hands. Your action, or inaction, will determine the health and care received by your patients.

It’s an important, and essential job.

During CNA training, though, it may not feel that important. It may feel downright exhausting. You’ll have to remember a number of new skills and a lot of information pertaining to taking care of your patients. Sometimes it might feel like there’s just too much, and you may struggle to keep your motivation. You can, though, with these tips.

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