CNA Pay Rates; A State By State Guide For Students In CNA Training

Why Pay Rates After CNA Training Vary From State To State?cna training

There are a great many factors involved in determining the average pay rates that you will receive after your CNA training. These pay rates can vary considerably from state to state. The most common reason for this is the respective cost of living expenses in the different states. Other factors can also include insurance costs, the level of private health care and state governed taxes.

What support is there to help protect pay rates after CNA training?

-The United States Department of Labor has a number of rules and guidelines that can help determine pay entitlements. There are also many state specific Nursing and Nursing Assistant Associations. As well as employee rights , unions and networks that can help you to ensure your rights and working conditions.

Is it worth relocating after my CNA training?

-In many cases it is not worth relocating purely for the chance of a higher rate of pay. As cost of living is one of the driving forces behind pay rates, you may be earning more but you will also have to spend more of that income on day to day expenses such as housing, food and transport.

How can I increase my pay rate after completing my CNA Training?

-Moving to the private sector, specializing your qualification or continuing on to more advanced nursing units can allow you to build on your CNA training and earn additional income.

Further training to become a registered nurse or Licensed Practicing or Vocational Nurse is generally considered to be the most beneficial and reliable path to increasing your pay after CNA training.

Average Pay Rates After CNA Training

In 2010 the national median pay rate students could earn after completing CNA training was $11.54, that equates to a salary of just over $24,000 a year. With the CNA job growth outlook at 20% before the year 2020 that wage has already begun to increase considerably, with the current rate at $25,000, but how does this translate on a state by state basis?

 Average salaries for CNAs in 2013 in alphabetical order:

Alabama – $25,000

Alaska – $18,000

American Samoa – $23,000

Arizona – $19,000

Arkansas – $21,000

California – $23,000

Colorado – $19,000

Connecticut – $23,000

Delaware – $20,000

Florida – $20,000

Georgia – $23,000

Guam – $18,000

Hawaii – $15,000

Idaho – $17,000

Illinois – $22,000

Indiana – $21,000

Iowa – $20,000

Kansas – $19,000

Kentucky – $18,000

Louisiana – $18,000

Maine – $19,000

Maryland – $21,000

Massachusetts – $24,000

Michigan – $21,000

Minnesota – $19,000

Mississippi – $25,000

Missouri – $21,000

Montana – $21,000

Nebraska – $17,000

Nevada – $19,000

New Hampshire – $21,000

New Jersey – $22,000

New Mexico – $19,000

New York – $25,000

North Carolina – $21,000

North Dakota – $20,000

Ohio – $20,000

Oklahoma – $19,000

Oregon – $20,000

Pennsylvania – $19,000

Puerto Rico – $21,000

Rhode Island – $21,000

South Carolina – $19,000

South Dakota – $16,000

Tennessee – $20,000

Texas – $20,000

Utah – $18,000

Vermont – $20,000

Virgin Islands – $24,000

Virginia – $21,000

Washington – $20,000

Washington DC – $24,000

West Virginia – $21,000

Wisconsin – $19,000

Wyoming – $19,000

For more CNA training and career information, continue to follow our blog.

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